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Sunday, August 2, 2020 | History

1 edition of But can I start a sentence with but? found in the catalog.

But can I start a sentence with but?

University of Chicago. Press

But can I start a sentence with but?

advice from the Chicago style Q & A

by University of Chicago. Press

  • 216 Want to read
  • 34 Currently reading

Published .
Written in English

    Subjects:
  • Authorship,
  • Handbooks, manuals,
  • Style manuals

  • Edition Notes

    Includes index.

    Statementthe University of Chicago Press editorial staff ; with a foreword by Carol Fisher Saller
    SeriesChicago guides to writing, editing, and publishing, Chicago guides to writing, editing, and publishing
    Classifications
    LC ClassificationsPN147 .B88 2016
    The Physical Object
    Paginationxi, 118 pages
    Number of Pages118
    ID Numbers
    Open LibraryOL27210550M
    ISBN 10022637064X
    ISBN 109780226370644
    LC Control Number2015037942
    OCLC/WorldCa920017579

    HE/SHE: Using "he" or "she” to begin sentences is fine and normal, but using he/she so many times in a row can become redundant, a little annoying, and lazy. This is just my opinion as a reader and writer though. With my writing, I believe in beginning sentences in more ways than just with "she" to describe what is happening, or how my characters feel. 3. Begin a sentence with an infinitive phrase used as an adjective: To get a head start, he arrived 20 minutes early. 4. Use an infinitive phrase as a subject: To get a head start was his goal. 5. Begin a sentence with a prepositional phrase and end it with the subject: From out of .

      If you are writing a literary piece, you can start a sentence with anything you like. But and And are great words to start sentences with. If you're writing something like an essay, you might want to stick more to the rules, but as far as I'm aware 'by' isn't included.   The topic sentence will contain the main topic or idea in the text. If you are working with a long original text, create a brief outline for each paragraph in the margin of the text. Include any keywords, phrases, or points in the summary. You can then use these notes in your summary : K.

    Beginning a Sentence with "Because" The Because Myth. Why do so many teachers tell students not to begin sentences with because?After all, this writing “rule” was — and is — bad advice, ignored by good writers everywhere. One moment italki is changing the way the world learns foreign languages.


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But can I start a sentence with but? by University of Chicago. Press Download PDF EPUB FB2

But Can I Start a Sentence with “But”. brings together the best of the Chicago Style Q&A. Curated from years of entries, it features some of the most popular—and hotly debated—rulings and also recovers old favorites long buried in the archives/5(10).

Can a grammar/usage/style book be "cute". Usually not, but this one manages - well, at least if you’re into grammar/usage/style books. This book is a short compilation of some questions and answers taken from the website of The Chicago Manual of Style.

Basically, most of the answers tend towards advice along the lines of “follow common sense,” “do what makes the text most readable /5. But Can I Start a Sentence with “But”. brings together the best of the Chicago Style Q&A.

Curated from years of entries, it features some of the most popular—and hotly debated—rulings and also recovers old favorites long buried in the archives. At school, we were taught you should never, ever, under any circumstances start a sentence with a conjunction. That rules out starting sentences with either “and” or “but” when writing.

I faithfully learned the rule. I became positively angry when I read books in which otherwise excellent writers seemed to make this faux pas. The short answer is yes; there is nothing grammatically wrong with starting a sentence with a conjunction like but, and, or or.

But this answer comes with a warning. The idea that you shouldn't begin a sentence with a conjunction is one of those "rules" that really isn't — along with some others you've probably heard, like "never split an infinitive" and "don't end a sentence with a preposition.".

But starting a sentence with a conjunction often has benefits. First, it makes writing more conversational and easier to read. It can also be used for stylistic effect to convey a particular tone.

Consider the following examples: Example 1: Emphasis. Before: Thump. With that one heart-pounding sound, Joanna knew her big presentation was doomed. Jim on Octo pm. Whatever the current trend may be, starting a sentence with “and,” “but,” or “or” is not acceptable in formal writing.

Furthermore, I believe it should be avoided because it makes your writing sound choppy, unintellegent, and lazy. According to a usage note in the fourth edition of The American Heritage Dictionary, " But may be used to begin a sentence at all levels of style." And in "The King's English", Kingsley Amis says that "the idea that and must not begin a sentence or even a paragraph, is an empty superstition.

The same goes for but. Although our subscriber asked specifically about starting sentences with and or but, any of the seven coordinating conjunctions may start a sentence. Coordinating conjunctions join words, phrases, and clauses that are balanced as logical equals: Mary and I. There is a widespread belief—one with no historical or grammatical foundation—that it is an error to begin a sentence with a conjunction such as and, but or so.

In fact, a substantial percentage. "This is about" is not a good way to start a sentence because you can give that information in the subject of the sentence.

For example, instead of: This is about a movie called "The Notebook" which is about a love story between a woman with Alzheimer's and her husband. When used with care and in the right context, it may be fine to begin a sentence with a conjunction like and or but and not fear the wrath of your pedantic friends.

However, scientific writing tends to be more formal and traditional, so sentences beginning with and or but should be avoided altogether. How to use book in a sentence. Example sentences with the word book. book example sentences.

Sentences you would probably start fishing around for the receipt for this book and read up on your book seller's return policy. 37 It is not necessary that a child should understand every word in a book before he can read with pleasure and.

Like a meter sprinter, your sentences should start strong and finish even stronger. Use a Variety of Words and Constructions to Start Your Sentences Some writers start. ‘And the idea that and must not begin a sentence, or even a paragraph, is an empty superstition.

The same goes for but. Indeed either word can give unimprovably early warning of the sort of thing that is to follow.’ Kingsley Amis, The King’s English (). I remember having the “don’t start a sentence with and or but” conversation with English teachers more than 20 years ago.

It didn’t make sense then, and it doesn’t make sense now. I read this sentence in a book: Being jealous, Mona would not let her boyfriend dance with any of the cheerleaders. I've seen similiar sentences starting with "being" but I don't know why an english person should start a sentence like that.

If I was going to say the same things, maybe i would say this one. A company can adopt a standardized approach or an internal models approach, with the former generally leading to much higher capital charges and the latter requiring regulatory approval.

Here, a subordinate clause headed by with ends rather than begins the sentence. In this case, simply omit the word and alter the form of the verbs that. Know what you want to write but aren't sure where to start.

These sentence prompts will help. Remember these 6 openings and you can write anything you want!. Of course. There’s no rule against starting a sentence with any of these words: if, because, but, and.

For years I promised my students $ in cash if they could find a reputable book that included one of these rules. Nobody ever collected the money. There’s no such rule and never has been. Learn more at Can a Sentence Start with “But”?. The task of writing a catchy first sentence can paralyze even the most acclaimed writers.

In an interview with the Atlantic, Stephen King admits he can spend months, or even years, on writing the opening lines for a new book. Sounds crazy, right? As business writers, we don’t have the luxury of time. Starting sentences with "so" isn't a trend or a thing.

However it may strike you, people aren't doing it any more frequently than they were 50 or years ago. In his book. You can use a comma or a dash to connect these pairs of sentences, but writing them separately is not incorrect. It is looked upon by some as informal. He started a sentence with a coordinating conjunction.

And that was the end of him. He started a sentence with a coordinating conjunction. But his wife didn’t leave him. He started a sentence with a coordinating conjunction.